Cycling Jerseys Part II

See this post and this post for background information on the Pastry Powered Cycling Jerseys.

There’s been enough demand we’re looking into printing another round of the cycling jerseys. The cost is $78/shirt, and we will wait until we have pre-ordered before the order is sent in. Once I send in the order, it will take 8 weeks until we receive the shirts. ORDER NOW and we can have them for next cycling season!

Here are some photos:

Women and men's front
Women’s and men’s front (Lauren and Ruben)
Old and new frontOld and new back

Front and back of the old shirts worn by Ruben (left) and new shirts worn by Erik

The shirts are manufactured by Canari. They sell some Canari shirts down at Gregg’s Greenlake or REI if you want to try one on for size, which I recommend as they seem a bit tight. (Look for the Reeses Pieces or other logo shirts). The shirts have raglan sleeves, a hidden zipper (zips halfway down) and 3 rear pockets, etc. You can see our modified pastry-powered turing machine on the back along with our new cycling along the infinite tape on the front. On the yellow sides are the CSE logo.

Here’s Canari’s size chart based on Chest sizes

Mens S M L XL
Chest size 38-40 40-42 42-44 46-48
Women’s c.s. 30-32 32-34 34-36 36-38

What to carry on your bike

On your bike

  • White light for the front
  • Red light for the back
  • Water bottle cages with at least one bottle of water
  • Bicycle computer
  • At least one small bag (like under the seat) to contain stuff below

At a minimum

  • ID (see previous post)
  • Snacks
  • Money
  • Small bicycle repair kit (allen wrenches, screwdrivers, etc)
  • Inner tube
  • Tire patch kit
  • Tire levers
  • Pump
  • Medicines
  • Cell phone or money to make a call
  • First aid kit

Good idea to have:

  • Lock and key
  • Tissues
  • Paper towels or wet wipes
  • Electrolyte drink or powder
  • Seattle bike map
  • King county bike map
  • Sunblock
  • Chapstick

Weather dependent (usually in a panier)

  • Shower cap to cover the seat if the bike is parked.
  • Knit cap or band to cover your ears
  • Spare wool socks
  • Jacket
  • Gloves (Long fingered if cold)
  • Long pants
  • Shoe covers

ID while riding

When riding, we should all have a piece of paper or an ID tag that lists our information and emergency contact info when we run/bike etc. PARTICULARLY if you’re running/biking for distance or when going out by yourself or in a group where you’re not familiar with all the people.

When I run, I have a 3×5 index car in my fanny pack that has:

My name
Address
Phone
Emergency contact name and phone
Physician and preferred hospital
Any known medical allergies/issues.

(Additionally I run with my driver’s license, 1 credit card and about $20 in case of emergencies. I bike with more but that’s because I have the paniers)

You could also get one of these: http://www.roadid.com/

I highly suggest by your next ride: at least get a 3×5 index card and put your information on that card. It’s small enough that you can keep in your seat bike bag with your spare tube etc

Bicycle trainers

Here is a compendium of answers to my question re: bicycle trainers

  • Two of my friends have Cycle-Ops fluid trainers and say that they are good and worth it. One thing that you can use to deal with stability issues is http://www.rei.com/product/48047981.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CYCLING_TOC. It will hold the wheel in place better than the old school telephone book.
  • We have an old Travel Trac from www.performancebike.com that works just fine.
  • The trainer that I’ve borrowed is this one: http://www.kurtkinetic.com/. It’s stable. I have no complaints. It does what it needs to. It’s a little loud, but I don’t know whether other trainers are quieter. An alternative to a trainer is rollers. There, you actually have to work to stay upright and balanced, and to not ride off them. It’s more like real riding. It takes more focus, which can be good or bad depending on what you’re looking for. Note that a bike trainer will wear down your tires more quickly than riding outside or than rollers. If you’re going to be riding your bike on a trainer a lot and not taking it outside, you might considergetting a cheap tire for the rear to avoid wearing out the hopefully-nice tire that you have on there now.